TRIBUTE TO BRIAN TERRY

January 24, 2014

This is a copy of a message posted by a lady who knew Brian Terry as a customer of store in which she worked.  It is a very warm tribute to a true hero.

(From Sonia) I’d like to honor this man today. This is Brian Terry (to my friends who don’t follow the news.) He came into my store everyday while he attended the academy. There are so many stories people share now about his integrity and honor. And I can tell you, he really was a good man. He was one of those guys who always had a smile on his face, said yes ma’am, and held himself with respect. No nonsense. Not trying to hit on every girl like so many other students. Everyday he would come in and get a monster energy drink so he could stay awake during classes. And every time he came in, he’d make our store manager blush just because he walked in. She was in her 60 or 70’s. It was adorable. No one has been held truly accountable for his death. It is a travesty that this honest and innocent man died. Please remember Brian Terry with me today.#operationfastandfurious #Brianterry

Photo: Today we remember Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry and his sacrifice for our country.

CONFIRMED: The DEA Struck A Deal With Mexico’s Most Notorious Drug Cartel

January 17, 2014

DEA Struck A Deal With Sinaloa Cartel

Photo By Damian Dovarganes/AP
FILE – In this June 10, 1993 file photo, Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, is shown to the press after his arrest at the high security prison of Almoloya de Juarez, on the outskirts of Mexico City. Mexico’s most powerful kingpin has won a two-year bloody battle for control of drug routes through the border city of Ciudad Juarez, U.S. intelligence has concluded, the latest indication that Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman’s Sinaloa cartel is coming out on top in the country’s drug war.

An investigation by El Universal  has found that between the years 2000 and 2012, the U.S. government had an arrangement with Mexico’s Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed the organization to smuggle billions of dollars of drugs in exchange for information on rival cartels. 

Sinaloa, led by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, supplies 80% of the drugs entering the Chicago area and has a presence in cities across the U.S.

There have long been allegations that Guzman, considered to be “the world’s most powerful drug trafficker,” coordinates with American authorities.

But the El Universal investigation is the first to publish court documents that include corroborating testimony from a DEA agent and a Justice Department official.

The written statements were made to the U.S. District Court in Chicago in relation to the arrest of Jesus Vicente Zambada-Niebla, the son of Sinaloa leader Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada and allegedly the Sinaloa cartel’s “logistics coordinator.”

Here’s what DEA agent Manuel Castanon told the Chicago court:

“On March 17, 2009, I met for approximately 30 minutes in a hotel room in Mexico City with Vincente Zambada-Niebla and two other individuals — DEA agent David Herrod and a cooperating source [Sinaloa lawyer Loya Castro] with whom I had worked since 2005. … I did all of the talking on behalf of [the] DEA.”

A few hours later, Mexican Marines arrested Zambada-Niebla (a.k.a. “El Vicentillo”) on charges of trafficking more than a billion dollars in cocaine and heroin. Castanon and three other agents then visited Zambada-Niebla in prison, where the Sinaloa officer “reiterated his desire to cooperate.”

El Universal, citing court documents, reports that DEA agents met with high-level Sinaloa officials more than 50 times since 2000.

Then-Justice Department prosecutor Patrick Hearn told the Chicago court that, according to DEA special agent Steven Fraga, Castro “provided information leading to a 23-ton cocaine seizure, other seizures related to “various drug trafficking organizations,” and that “El Mayo” Zambada wanted his son to cooperate with the U.S.

Source: Michael Kelley, provided by Business Insider | January 13, 2014

U.S. STATE DEPT. TRAVEL WARNING…MEXICO

January 17, 2014

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Mexico Travel Warning Last updated: January 9, 2014

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling in Mexico due to threats to safety and security posed by Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) in the country. U.S. citizens have been the target of violent crimes, such as kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery by TCOs in various Mexican states. For information on security conditions in specific regions of Mexico, which can vary, travelers should reference the state-by-state assessments further below.

This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mexico, issued July 12, 2013, to update information about the security situation and to advise the public of additional restrictions on the travel of U.S. government (USG) personnel.

General Conditions:

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day. The Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) have targeted U.S. visitors or residents based on their nationality. Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that are reported in the border region or in areas along major trafficking routes.

Nevertheless, U.S. travelers should be aware that the Mexican government has been engaged in an extensive effort to counter TCOs which engage in narcotics trafficking and other unlawful activities throughout Mexico. The TCOs themselves are engaged in a violent struggle to control drug trafficking routes and other criminal activity. Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur anywhere. U.S. citizens have fallen victim to criminal activity, including homicide, gun battles, kidnapping, carjacking and highway robbery. While most of those killed in narcotics-related violence have been members of TCOs, innocent persons have also been killed. The number of U.S. citizens reported to the Department of State as murdered in Mexico was 71 in 2012 and 81 in 2013.

Gun battles between rival TCOs or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico, especially in the border region. Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs. During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. TCOs have used stolen cars, buses and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable. We recommend that you defer travel to the areas indicated in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the northern border region.

The number of kidnappings throughout Mexico is of particular concern and appears to be on the rise. According to statistics published by the Mexican Secretaria de Gobernacion (SEGOB), during the first 11 months of 2013 kidnappings nationwide increased 32 percent over the same period in 2012. While kidnappings can occur anywhere, according to SEGOB during this timeframe, the states with the highest numbers of kidnappings were Guerrero, Tamaulipas, Michoacán, Estado de Mexico, and Morelos. Additionally, according to a widely publicized study by the agency responsible for national statistics (INEGI, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography), Mexico suffered an estimated 105,682 kidnappings in 2012; only 1,317 were reported to the police. Police have been implicated in some of these incidents. Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized. Almost 90 kidnappings of U.S. citizens were reported to the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Mexico between April and November of 2013.

U.S. citizens are encouraged to lower their personal profiles and to avoid wearing conspicuous jewelry or clothing bearing logos of U.S. sports teams or military themed apparel which that may identify them as U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens are encouraged to maintain awareness of their surroundings and avoid situations in which they may be isolated.

Kidnappings in Mexico have included traditional, “express” and “virtual” kidnappings. Victims of traditional kidnappings are physically abducted and held captive until a ransom is paid for release. “Express” kidnappings are those in which a victim is abducted for a short time and forced to withdraw money, usually from an ATM, then released. A “virtual” kidnapping is an extortion by deception scheme wherein a victim is contacted by phone and convinced to isolate themselves from family and friends until a ransom is paid. The victim is coerced (by threat of violence) to remain isolated and to provide phone numbers for the victim’s family or loved ones. The victim’s family is then contacted and a ransom for the “kidnapped” extracted. Recently, some travelers to Mexico staying at hotels as guests have been targets of such “virtual” kidnapping schemes.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents. Most victims who complied with carjackers’ demands have reported that they were not physically harmed. Carjackers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee. Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds. There are indications that criminals target newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs. However, even drivers of old sedans and buses coming from the United States have been targeted. While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur at night and on isolated roads. To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads (“cuotas”) whenever possible.

The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat the TCOs. U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways by car or bus may encounter government checkpoints, staffed by military or law enforcement personnel. TCOs have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them. You should cooperate at all checkpoints.

The Department imposes restrictions on U.S. government employees’ travel in Mexico. Since July 2010, USG employees are prohibited from driving on non-official travel from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior of Mexico or Central America. One exception is that personal travel by motor vehicle is permitted on Highway 15 toll road between Hermosillo and Nogales during daylight hours.

USG personnel and their families are prohibited from personal travel to all areas to which it is advised to “defer non-essential travel”. When travel for official purposes is essential, it is conducted with extensive security precautions. USG personnel and their families are allowed to travel for personal reasons to the areas where no advisory is in effect or where the advisory is to exercise caution. While the general public is not forbidden from visiting places categorized under “defer non-essential travel,” USG personnel will not be able to respond quickly to an emergency situation in those areas due to security precautions that must be taken by USG personnel to travel to those areas.

For more information about travel and other conditions in Mexico, including individual states. (Use Link Below)

http://tinyurl.com/oczshhw
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Emergency Message for U.S. Citizens: El Salvador Warns of Critical Crime 1/14/2014

This message is to remind U.S. citizens residing and traveling in El Salvador of the critical crime threat in El Salvador. Most travelers to El Salvador experience no safety or security problems, but as noted in our August 9, 2013, Travel Warning for El Salvador, both random and organized violent crime is endemic throughout El Salvador. U.S. citizens are not normally singled out based on their nationality, but are subject to the same threats as all other persons in El Salvador.

Over the last several weeks, several joggers and pedestrians were robbed at gunpoint in the immediate area around U.S. Embassy San Salvador. Blogs associated with local running and cycling groups have also reported on runners being targeted in the Santa Elena area as well as other affluent areas, such as Escalon and San Benito. Due to these issues, U.S. Embassy security officials advise all U.S. Government personnel not to walk, run or cycle in the unguarded streets and parksof El Salvador, even in groups, and recommend exercising only in gyms and fitness centers.

More info at link below:
http://tinyurl.com/ong8t79

BP Boat dedicated to Brian Terry…

August 31, 2013

http://republicanbeliever.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/terrry1.jpg%3Fw%3D614?w=450

OPEN:  http://tinyurl.com/ppqr3yt

August 17, 2013

 

August 8, 2013

 

August 8, 2013

 

‘Phony’ Scandal? Mother of Slain Border Agent Responds

August 3, 2013

brian1

In Memory of Brian Terry, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Marine-video
Please skip ad & go directly to You Tube video tribute.                                                                                                                                             http://youtu.be/VpwwJeRwM5Y

‘Where’s the Justice for My Son?’ Slain Border Agent’s Mother                                                                                                                                                  Outraged at Obama’s “Phony” Remarks

by Fox News Insider // Jul 28 2013 // 5:35pm

While President Obama tries to convince Americans the recent

scandals facing his administration are “phony,” the victims of the 

Fast and Furious controversy still haven’t received answers.

Border Agent Brian Terry was killed with a weapon linked

to the botched gun-running operation nearly three years ago.

His mother Josephine Terry and uncle, Ralph Terry, spoke out

on Fox and Friends today.

Fast and Furious Guns STILL Being Linked to Murders

Josephine had a message for the president: “I was very outraged

when he made that comment because he knew that my son was

a victim of Fast and Furious. And if that’s not enough proof for

him, well, he can come to Michigan and I’ll take him to the cemetery.

Him and I can have a conversation about what a phony scandal is.”

She choked up when talking about being strong through her fight

for the justice her son deserves. Terry’s mother wondered,

“How come nobody’s standing accountable? I think my son deserves

[justice]. I feel like they did throw him underneath the bus too.” 

Ralph, who is president of the Brian Terry Foundation, cited an

Inspector General report which found that 14 people in the

administration did know what was going on with the Operation

Fast and Furious. “We’d like to know […] what happened to those

14 people. Are they still working for the ATF?”


Mexico Travel Warnings-go to link/scroll down for individual states

August 3, 2013

 

“Gun battles between rival TCOs or with Mexican authorities have taken place in towns and cities in many parts of Mexico, especially in the border region. Gun battles have occurred in broad daylight on streets and in other public venues, such as restaurants and clubs. During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. TCOs have used stolen cars, buses and trucks to create roadblocks on major thoroughfares, preventing the military and police from responding to criminal activity. The location and timing of future armed engagements is unpredictable. We recommend that you defer travel to the areas indicated in this Travel Warning and exercise extreme caution when traveling throughout the northern border region.

The number of kidnappings and disappearances throughout Mexico is of particular concern. Both local and expatriate communities have been victimized. In addition, local police have been implicated in some of these incidents. We strongly advise you to lower your profile and avoid displaying any evidence of wealth that might draw attention.

Carjacking and highway robbery are serious problems in many parts of the border region, and U.S. citizens have been murdered in such incidents. Most victims who complied with carjackers at these checkpoints have reported that they were not physically harmed. Carjackers have shot at vehicles that fail to stop at checkpoints. Incidents have occurred during the day and at night, and carjackers have used a variety of techniques, including bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop and running vehicles off the road at high speeds. There are some indications that criminals have particularly targeted newer and larger vehicles, especially dark-colored SUVs. However, victims driving a variety of vehicles, from late model SUVs to old sedans have also been targeted. While violent incidents have occurred at all hours of the day and night on both modern toll highways (“cuotas”) and on secondary roads, they have occurred most frequently at night and on isolated roads. To reduce risk, if absolutely necessary to travel by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to use toll roads whenever possible. The Mexican government has deployed federal police and military personnel throughout the country as part of its efforts to combat the TCOs. U.S. citizens traveling on Mexican roads and highways may encounter government checkpoints, which are often staffed by military personnel or law enforcement personnel. TCOs have erected their own unauthorized checkpoints, at times wearing police and military uniforms, and killed or abducted motorists who have failed to stop at them. You should cooperate at all checkpoints.” More at link below:
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_6033.html

Also, military/government personnel warning:

Caught! Immigration bill shackles border agents Bars them from considering race or ethnicity ‘to any degree’

July 29, 2013

 

A truckload of young Hispanic men is spotted by a U.S. Border Patrol agent rumbling down a dusty road a mile north of the Mexican border toward El Paso, Texas.

 

Something the reader should understand before reading this posting.  Profiling is certainly illegal in our country but consider this.  In the last fiscal year those apprehended entering our country illegally represented 73 different countries!  Those included every one of the countries which our authorities have labeled “countries which sponsor terror”.  Let’s ask the obvious question……what are the agents supposed to do if not using their intuitive instincts ?

How should the agent respond?

 

Under the immigration-reform bill currently under consideration by Congress, Border Patrol agents or any other law-enforcement officer who stops such a vehicle to demand identification might be found in violation of the law.

 

The legislation bars all federal law-enforcement officers, including border agents, from using race or ethnicity “to any degree” while making routine or spontaneous law-enforcement decisions, a WND review of the legislation has found.

 

The bill further calls for the Homeland Security Department to collect data on immigration enforcement activities to determine the existence of racial profiling.

 

The data would be utilized to issue future guidelines to officers regarding the use of race or ethnicity during routine enforcement.

 

The bill states that “in making routine or spontaneous law enforcement decisions, such as ordinary traffic stops, Federal law enforcement officers may not use race or ethnicity to any degree, except that officers may rely on race and ethnicity if a specific suspect description exists.”

 

The bill defines federal law-enforcement officers as any “officer, agent, or employee of the United States authorized by law or by a Government agency to engage in or supervise the prevention, detection, investigation, or prosecution of any violation of Federal law.”

 

The definition includes U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents.

 

It is clear that immigration enforcement officials are singled out by the new directives.

 

The legislation refers specifically to border-security agents with another clause that states “in enforcing laws protecting the integrity of the Nation’s borders, Federal law enforcement officers may not consider race or ethnicity except to the extent permitted by the Constitution and laws of the United States.”

 

If the legislation is enacted, the bill calls for the DHS secretary to begin within 180 days the collection of data regarding the “individualized immigration enforcement activities of covered Department officers.”

 

The data is to be utilized immediately to possibly issue new guidelines.

 

The act states that within 180 days of the data collection, the DHS secretary “shall complete a study analyzing the data.”

 

Ninety days after the study is complete, the bill dictates the secretary, in consultation with the attorney general, “shall issue regulations regarding the use of race, ethnicity, and any other suspect classifications the Secretary deems appropriate by covered Department officers.”

 

The bill allows for some exceptions to the racial profiling restriction.

 

It states federal law-enforcement officers may consider race and ethnicity “only to the extent that there is trustworthy information, relevant to the locality or time frame that links persons of a particular race or ethnicity to an identified criminal incident, scheme, or organization.”


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